portrait of young sick man sitting on hospital bed, hospital bed patient

If you’re sick, you head to the doctor and hopefully, the doctor helps you to feel better. However, occasionally, your doctor may make a mistake and make you feel worse; sometimes a lot worse. If you’ve been on the receiving end of care that put your health at risk, you have rights.

What is Medical Malpractice?

This personal injury attorney defines medical malpractice as a healthcare professional failing to maintain the standards of care required of them. One important standard of care is to do no harm. If you are already on a medication and receive improper prescriptions that react dangerously to the meds you’re already taking, you may be the victim of malpractice. When discussing your health history, make sure to tell the person taking your history everything you’re taking, including herbal supplements, homeopathic treatments, and current prescriptions.

Find a New Doctor

This may seem simple, but if you’re very sick or permanently damaged due to poor care, you may be worried about searching for a new doctor.  According to medical experts, people who’ve been injured by poor medical care can actually develop PTSD. You may find help searching for a new doctor from support groups. There are several groups that focus on people with chronic and poorly understood illnesses such as Multiple Chemical Sensitivities or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Check out their community forums and look for doctors that get high ratings for being good listeners.

Become a Difficult Patient

If you’ve been hurt by improper medical care, you probably know that doctors are human and can make mistakes. However, if you’ve been given one improper prescription, you know it may happen again. Review every prescription you’re given. Find out what the drug treats, how long you’re supposed to take it, what the dosage is and what the interactive risks are. If you feel unheard, get louder. When you walk out of your doctor’s office, you should know exactly what prescription you need to pick up and why.

Remember Your Expertise

You are the expert when it comes to your body. Even though a medication has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug and Administration, there is still a possibility of unwanted side effects for some patients.  If acetaminophen makes you sick and your physician doesn’t believe you and prescribes prescription strength acetaminophen in combination with cough syrup for a bad cold, make a fuss. If you’ve taken ibuprofen before and had serious stomach upset, including bleeding, argue until you get a better recommendation. You are a patient, not a lab rat. If some medications cause a strange and rare reaction in you, you should receive a recommendation for a better alternative. If not, shop for another doctor.  Drugwatch

Overshare on Your History

Your medical history is private, but you may need to make some embarrassing things public with your doctor to get the best care. For example, some people use Viagra as entertainment. However, there are complications from Viagra that can turn deadly. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration explains how important it is to follow the instructions on the box and to ask the pharmacist or doctor if you have any questions about the medication. Some illegal drugs can cause dangerously high levels of pulse or blood pressure. If you need emergency care from an illegal drug, seek it, stay alive and deal with the consequences. To that end, it’s also important to be responsible for your own health. Don’t take medications you don’t really need. Stay away from illegal drugs or any mood-altering product provided to you by a stranger. You’re the expert of your own body, so why poison it? 

If your doctor doesn’t listen, press your point. Track your reactions to medications to make sure you don’t get a prescription that has damaged you in the past, particularly if they caused illness, hives, or breathing difficulties. Tell your doctor exactly what medications and supplements you’re currently taking, and if you have questions, ask until you understand.


If you found this article helpful, check out “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Kratom”.

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